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From the 2008 Adam Sandler Blockbuster movie Zohan:




F R E E D O M

Disco-Disco.com
Mentioned by: F R E E D O M - by Elvert Xavier Barnes
Featured: F R E E D O M in December, 2009.


It is at this time that I'd like to send a special 'shout out' to Discoguy of Disco-Disco.com whose interviews with Tom Moulton and various DJs and Remixers served as the very foundation of this tribute.


-- Elvert Barnes





Galaxy

Disco-Disco.com
Plugged by: Galaxy North East
Featured: Galaxy in June, 2004.


Your website was mentioned on the UK radio station Galaxy a few times in June.
It was due to a big disco night being held in the North East and the station was running a competition to win tickets. If I remember rightly your website was one of a few mentioned for more information regarding disco. It was mentioned a few times a day for a few days.


-- Alan





WebRadio WCWP

Disco-Disco.com
Plugged by: Jay Mirabile
Featured: WebRadio WCWP in April, 2004.


Jay have informed about my web-site and features through his Saturday 2PM-4PM EST WebRadio show.
Click the links to tune in the show !


-- Discoguy





Click - to read this piece in the NY1 News page

Website Review: Disco-Disco.com
Written by: Noah Robischon
Featured: NY1 News [TV] on April 15th, 2003.


Disco still isn't dead. At least not at www.disco-disco.com, a website full of hustle and mirrored globes.
Before strutting onto the multicolored dance floor, read up on the history of the music and Tom Moulton, the man who invented the 12-inch mix. There are also pages about several of the New York-based labels that got the disco ball spinning back in the 1970s, like Casablanca, West End Records, Prelude, and SalSoul.
The creator of the site, a 37-year-old Swede named Claes, interviews some of the founders of these record labels along with well-known artists of the era like Gloria Gaynor and Anita Ward. There's even a tribute page to Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards, better known as Chic, one of the most successful song-writing teams of the day.
Their song "Dance, Dance, Dance" was the first to use sub-bass, that low-end speaker rumble that is still heard in nearly every dance club. But the best known song by Chic is "Le Freak," and it was written one night after the duo were turned away from Studio 54 in freezing snow. The tune would ironically become the first track on the compilation album, "A Night at Studio 54".
That famous nightspot isn't the only discotheque profiled on the site. The "Clubs" section features rare photos and anecdotes about Paradise Garage in Greenwich Village, and the 26th Street dive with a happy clown logo called Fun House, which was home to a remix artist from the Bronx known as Jellybean Benitez. In 1983, he went on to produce the first record for his then girlfriend, Madonna.
Every stop on the website has a selection of classic disco tunes that you can listen to as accompaniment by using Real Audio. Discoguy also offers a comprehensive list of recommended CDs and books, including a few box sets that will keep you shaking your groove thing with Peaches & Herb until the dawn.
And just in case you've forgotten how, the "Disco" section of the site even has illustrated instructions on how to do the California hustle.


-- Noah Robischon





Click - to read this piece in the Houston Chronicle page

What's online
Written by: Cay Dickson
Featured: Houston Chronicle [Newspaper] on May 6th, 2003.


DISCO HERE
-- Dancers used to slide onto the dance floor and shake their groove things for hours on end when disco dominated the music world. The attire was skintight shirts and pants for the men and clingy dresses and high heels for the ladies. Disco-Disco, at www.disco-disco.com, a site that pays tremendous tribute to that era, is the creation of a Swedish lad who is enamored of the glamorous glitz. He covers the history of disco, including his claim that military officials asked the Village People to write a song about the Navy, which resulted in new recruits. Who could forget the infamous Studio 54 and the lines that formed as the "right people" were the only ones allowed to join in the club's wild adventures? Visit this site for a hustle down memory lane, and while you're at it, check out the page with instructions to the dance.


-- Cay Dickson

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