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 Post subject: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 1:56 am 
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Brothers, I just got this book delivered and it is like it's Christmas!!!!

Vince Aletti (who is a great writer), was the weekly Disco columnist at Record World Magazine. Record World was Billboard's main competition at the time.

Here in this book he had placed every single weekly article from 1975-1978.
Also included are his early articles from Rolling Stone and other mags from 1973-1974.

800 club charts.-- from all the hot clubs & DJs of the day!
2,000 records reviewed.
This is MUST reading---many memories for me.
I'm loving it!!!!

Available from Djhistory.com

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:01 am 
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Seen this advertised, I'll go off your judgement and order a copy bro!

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:28 am 
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This is the joint, bro.
Worth every penny!!! (not expensive at all!!!)
From the Golden Age of Disco!!!
I used to wait for every monday to see Record World and find out what new tracks Vince was gonna write about.
Then spend the rest of the week hunting it down!!!!

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 1:00 pm 
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I have pre-order it via djhistory from the last week!!!
It looks fantastic :D so maany charts and infos!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:15 am 
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mine just came in the mail (and the CD was unbroken, glory be!)

I want to read the whole thing at once! the only gripe I have is, they didn't INDEX it! o noes! I'd have paid extra for that. that said, had I known it would be unindexed I'd have bought it anyway, to be perfectly honest. you just can't get this stuff anywhere else (and now I can find out what songs they were playing on my birthday in 1976!)


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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:35 pm 
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Yup! Mines been ordered....should be here in a few weeks! :)

Can't wait. :twisted:

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 6:49 pm 
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He’s there each night from ten to closing time,

With sights and sounds to help the crowds unwind,

And from the booth each night he blows your mind

With his mix and tricks



Forget – for the moment at least – Donna Summer, Silver Convention, Brass Construction, Gloria Gaynor, Bohannon, Love Unlimited – that endless ever-changing, slippery starstream of names shooting through disco heaven. The real stars of the seventies disco boom aren’t on records, they’re spinning them.



Discotheque DJs are no longer mere human jukeboxes – they’ve become tastemakers, record-breakers (several have received gold records in recognition of their influence on sales), mood magicians, performers with personal styles. The new DJ doesn’t just change records, he creates a “total evening,” a musical “journey,” blending records into “one continuous song, one story.” As Tom Savarese, one of New York’s top DJs puts it, “From the moment I go in there to the moment I leave – that’s my canvas.”



To conjure up this kind of vibrant, volatile aural landscape the DJ has to be part artist (the medium: musical collage), part technician, part crowd psychologist. Some would say a total madmen. You have to know your records inside out, they say: the intros, the fades, the breaks, the changes, then maybe you’ll understand why disco DJs talk about “my music.” This intimate knowledge allows them to weave record into record, making one seamless tapestry. Like any artist, a talented DJ develops an individual, idiosyncratic style. One is famous for his drum collages – his hot pulsing evocation of the urban jungle. Another has a trademark sound that’s cool, loose and sweetly ecstatic. Still another will purposely break the floor “like a billiard table,” shifting the crowd for a record he feels they should hear, nudging them into unfamiliar music. Others are abrasive or frenzied or cheerfully crowd-pleasing, but they all stamp the music with their personal taste. The best inspire passionately loyal followings that trail them from club to club. (In New York, where discos open and close at the drop of a Thorens tonearm, most experienced DJs can reel off a list of past jobs – Sanctuary, the Haven, Machine I, Machine II, Tambourlaine, Limelight, the Ice Palace, Le Jardin, Make-Believe Ballroom – that reads like an index to the city’s underground high and low life for the past ten years.)



But if disco DJing is an art, it’s solidly based on technology – not only on the mastery of elaborate systems of turntables, mixers, speakers, amps, filters, headphones and lightboards but on a sensitivity to the technical pluses and minuses of the records. DJs quickly develop a sharp critical ear for the quality of a mix or a pressing, if only because disco equipment is sure to exaggerate flaws. When record companies realized that a muddy studio mix or a drastically reduced sound level was keeping their records off disco turntables they snapped to with special pressings “For Disco DJs Only,” usually single long tracks on limited edition, high-quality twelve-inch discs. This past spring, a number of companies began commercially marketing these discs – the first new record format in decades – and found them selling briskly to people eager for the same full length and quality they had heard in the clubs. (Appropriately, the first “disco disc” in the stores, Double Exposure’s stunning “Ten Percent,” was “disco blended” by New York DJ Walter Gibbons, one of a small but increasing number of spinners crossing over to the production side of the music.) Not only was the disco DJ the impetus behind the creation of the “disco disc” but he was the key factor in the development of the entire specialized disco market that record and equipment manufacturers are now turning into a goldmine.



Another necessary talent of the successful disco DJ is a subtle, spontaneous, sure understanding of crowd control. Even when he’s removed, often elevated above the dance floor, absorbed in the next blend, the next switching of knobs and flashing of lights, the DJ has to be simultaneously on the floor, in the midst of the crowd, anticipating its mood at the same time he’s channeling it. It isn’t a matter of simply playing a hot record. Anyone can do that. The DJ must sense the moment when it will have its greatest impact: when the crowd wants it the most and when they least expect it; when they’ll burst into delirious screams on hearing the first three notes. The DJ has to know how long to run them, when to ease up and smooth out, when to hit a peak and keep pushing, when to slip in something new so they’ll love it and not clear the floor. It’s an intuitive science. David Mancuso, famous for the private disco parties at his Loft in New York, describes his approach this way: “I can’t program myself to what happens because it all gets so spontaneous. I don’t plan it, I don’t feel I have any control over it. I’m only a part of the whole, a part of the dance.”





© Vince Aletti

Originally published in After Dark, Nov 1976

photo © Eric Stephen Jacobs.


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Last edited by Jay Negron on Tue Apr 28, 2009 7:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 7:02 pm 
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Vince Aletti's Disco Files is the best book about Disco music I have read by far!!!!!


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 Post subject: Jay's 1975 Chart
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 8:45 pm 
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The 1975 Disco Chart from you and Paul Salari from the Playhouse Club is rockin' Jay :D !!!!


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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 9:29 pm 
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That crowd at The Playhouse was great for breaking new music.
I could play my brand new hot records between 12:30am-2am.
And they would love it & depend on it.

Tropicalia in Manhattan was different.
If I played all new music between 12:30am-2am, I would lose the crowd.
I had to mix it up there.
I already knew how to mix good in 1974,
but in Manhattan in Tropicalia is where I learned how to really DJ!!
The crowd was more demanding in the city.
If you was not 'on your game' they would let you know in a heartbeat.

It took me 2 straight months, playing 4-5 nights a week to learn.
People get confused--it's not about just playing & mixing records.
It's about ATMOSPHERE and MOMENTUM!!!

I learned from the best-->
Paul Solari (my mentor), Walter Gibbons, David Mancuso, & Ritchie Conte.

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 11:45 pm 
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I am having a great time reading this book! it's going to be *filled* with bookmarks soon enough I'm sure.

I have to admit that I'm really enjoying the little thrill of reading a chart from some DJ I think is awesome, noticing a favorite track and thinking "hey, *I* spin that!" :-D

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:01 am 
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Jay Negron wrote:
That crowd at The Playhouse was great for breaking new music.
I could play my brand new hot records between 12:30am-2am.
And they would love it & depend on it.

Tropicalia in Manhattan was different.
If I played all new music between 12:30am-2am, I would lose the crowd.
I had to mix it up there.
I already knew how to mix good in 1974,
but in Manhattan in Tropicalia is where I learned how to really DJ!!
The crowd was more demanding in the city.
If you was not 'on your game' they would let you know in a heartbeat.

It took me 2 straight months, playing 4-5 nights a week to learn.
People get confused--it's not about just playing & mixing records.
It's about ATMOSPHERE and MOMENTUM!!!

I learned from the best-->
Paul Solari (my mentor), Walter Gibbons, David Mancuso, & Ritchie Conte.



Jay...love the fact that you mention ATMOSPHERE here, like you did in the Mancuso bio.
So many Dj's forget this factor while they are spinning. They are concentrating so much on there beat-matching that they tend to forget about there programming, which leads to a lifeless atmosphere....I would rather go to a club where the programming is paramount which leads to a great atmosphere than a club that has a seamless mixer but no atmosphere....You get my drift brother?...Its not all about the mixing for me....

Still waiting for my copy of the Disco Files to arrive in the mail. Going off what you have posted so far, I know I am in for a treat!...can't wait!

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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Tue May 05, 2009 7:54 pm 
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I'm just reading mine now - Reminding me of all the great tracks I've forgotten!


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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Sat May 09, 2009 1:07 pm 
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Here's the C.D. I got with the book: http://www.mediafire.com/?udzxjqtgoqm


To listen to cool Soul, Disco, JazzFunk & Dance visit http://www.dazlingsoul.com


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 Post subject: Re: THE DISCO FILES 1973-1978
 Post Posted: Sun May 10, 2009 5:59 pm 
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Dazler,

A question - which kind of file is that mix ? Doesn't seem to be a mp3 ?!

// Discoguy

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